England “Dinner” Vs. “Tea” Map

Map by YouGov

The map above is that of England, one of the constituent countries of the United Kingdom (UK). It shows how English people refer to their final meal of the day: “dinner” or “tea”.

It should be noted that the word “tea” in this context refers to a meal, as in “afternoon tea” or “high tea”, which may or may not be served with a cup of drinking tea.

Dinner Or Tea: What Do English People Consume?

Research group YouGov surveyed more than 40,000 people in England regarding the meal that ends their long day. 

The result is that more than half of those who responded – 57% – call it “dinner” (indicated by the blue shades in the map), and that 36% of English people say the meal is their “tea” (shown in green). 

The people who say “dinner” are found in the southern counties of England, while those in the north take their “tea”.


Is There A Difference Between Dinner And Tea?

There is not much difference between the usage of the words dinner and tea to refer to the meal that caps one’s day.

An article from NPR notes that the “tea” that is used when referring to an evening meal in Britain can also be called “high tea” to distinguish it from “afternoon tea”.

The latter refers to a light meal served with a cup of tea and various sweet treats, taken at around 3 to 4 p.m.

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